Recent Changes

Tuesday, October 3

  1. page Bitachon edited ... Melody Beattie, "The Language of Letting Go:" "Today, I will stop straining to …
    ...
    Melody Beattie, "The Language of Letting Go:" "Today, I will stop straining to know what I don't know. To see what I can't see. To understand what I don't yet understand. I will trust that being is sufficient, And I will let go of my need to figure things out."
    Texts:
    "Three Pathways for Living with Trust," Rabbi David Jaffe
    Bitachon poem by Anne Lamott {Bitachon poem by Anne Lamott.docx}
    Children's Unit from Beth El, Sudbury River Valley: {Bitachon_Cong Beth El.pdf}
    (view changes)
    6:47 pm

Monday, October 2

  1. page Hitlamdut edited ... “I can see that she is just practicing thoughtful speech.” TEXTS: "Life Lessons from L…
    ...
    “I can see that she is just practicing thoughtful speech.”
    TEXTS:
    "Life Lessons from Leaves," Kol Nidrei sermon on Hitlamdut, Rabbi David Ackerman, Beth Am Israel, Penn Valley PA.
    "The Blessing of Curiosity" (Rabbi Sam Feinsmith, Chicagoland Jewish High School)
    A Meditation for the "Wandering Mind"
    (view changes)
    12:18 pm
  2. page Anavah edited ... Always seek to learn wisdom from everyone, to recognize your failings and correct them. In doi…
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    Always seek to learn wisdom from everyone, to recognize your failings and correct them. In doing so you will learn to stop thinking about your virtues and you will take your mind off your friend’s faults. (Rabbi Menachem Mendel Lefin of Satanov, Cheshbon haNefesh).
    D'var Torah on Anavah in parshat Ki Tisa (Shelby Haverson): {shelby haverson drash on ki tisa and anavah.docx}
    RH sermon on "Practicing Anavah" (Rabbi David Ackerman, Beth Am Israel, Penn Valley PA.
    Chants and Songs:
    Niggun: Elohai neshama shenatata bi tehora hi
    (view changes)
    12:16 pm

Thursday, September 28

  1. page Sh'tikah edited Sh'tikah/Thoughtful speech - Shtikah is often interpreted as silence. But the meaning here is not…

    Sh'tikah/Thoughtful speech - Shtikah is often interpreted as silence. But the meaning here is not silence, it is thoughtful speech. That means that we hold our speech inside our heads until we determine whether or not it will benefit us or be of value to others. Optimally, it will benefit both. Meaningful speech is not telling someone else what to do or offering advice. That type of one-way dialogue is rarely fulfilling for the provider of information or the receiver. The most meaningful speech supports another to explore a situation more deeply or view a different perspective. The most meaningful speech is an invitation to journey, whether that is in a business or a family situation. When you are part of that kind of exchange, you can feel deep joy in connecting with another human being.
    ...
    foot. (Anonymous)
    Videos:
    VIDEO from IKAR (Los Angeles CA) on shmirat halashon:
    ...
    Poetry:
    "Silence II" by Elaine Maria Upton
    "Words" by Dana Gioia: {%22Words%22 Dana Gioia.docx}
    Focus Phrases:
    Shtikah - Chicagoland Jewish High School Focus Phrase Reminders
    מָוֶת וְחַיִּים בְּיַדוְחַיִּים בְּיַד לָשׁוֹן Death
    ...
    לַחָכְמָה - שְׁתִיקָהשְׁתִיקָה Silence is
    Lesson Plans:
    Shetikah and Shemirat Halashon - Chicagoland Jewish High School Middot Minyan Lesson Plans
    (view changes)
    10:07 am

Tuesday, September 26

  1. page Sh'tikah edited Sh'tikah/Thoughtful speech - Shtikah is often interpreted as silence. But the meaning here is not…

    Sh'tikah/Thoughtful speech - Shtikah is often interpreted as silence. But the meaning here is not silence, it is thoughtful speech. That means that we hold our speech inside our heads until we determine whether or not it will benefit us or be of value to others. Optimally, it will benefit both. Meaningful speech is not telling someone else what to do or offering advice. That type of one-way dialogue is rarely fulfilling for the provider of information or the receiver. The most meaningful speech supports another to explore a situation more deeply or view a different perspective. The most meaningful speech is an invitation to journey, whether that is in a business or a family situation. When you are part of that kind of exchange, you can feel deep joy in connecting with another human being.
    A closed mouth gathers no foot. (Anonymous)
    Videos:
    VIDEO from IKAR (Los Angeles CA) on shmirat halashon:
    (view changes)
    8:10 am

Monday, September 25

  1. page Bitachon edited ... “To have faith is to trust yourself to the water. When you swim you don't grab hold of the wat…
    ...
    “To have faith is to trust yourself to the water. When you swim you don't grab hold of the water, because if you do you will sink and drown. Instead you relax, and float.” Alan W. Watts
    “Faith does not need to push the river because faith is able to trust that there is a river. The river is flowing. We are in it.” Richard Rohr
    Melody Beattie, "The Language of Letting Go:" "Today, I will stop straining to know what I don't know. To see what I can't see. To understand what I don't yet understand. I will trust that being is sufficient, And I will let go of my need to figure things out."
    Texts:
    Bitachon poem by Anne Lamott {Bitachon poem by Anne Lamott.docx}
    (view changes)
    6:48 am

Tuesday, August 29

  1. page Savlanut edited Savlanut, {savlanut ice cream.jpg} Savlanut, or the ... the fuse. {savlanut ice cream.jpg} …

    Savlanut,{savlanut ice cream.jpg} Savlanut, or the
    ...
    the fuse.
    {savlanut ice cream.jpg}

    Savlanut/Chesed Practice Standing in Line:
    Focus Phrases and Kabbalot
    (view changes)
    5:49 pm
  2. page Savlanut edited Savlanut, or the ability to hold with emotional discomfort, is a key middah for all spiritual and…

    Savlanut, or the ability to hold with emotional discomfort, is a key middah for all spiritual and emotional growth. While often translated as Patience, I think Forebearance is a better literal description of this middah. The Hebrew root ס.ב.ל./S.V.L means to bear or suffer. Rav Wolbe uses the image of carrying a load to describe Savlanut. Each relationship we have comes with a certain load we need to carry if we are to stay in the relationship. None of us are perfect and we all have “baggage.” We need Savlanut to deal with our own baggage and that of our children, partners, parents and friends. We practice savlanut when we bear that load without throwing it off. Savlanut calls on us to respond to annoyances and real insult in a way that maintains the relationship. To extend the metaphor of carrying, if the burden feels too heavy we may need to get help carrying it rather than just throwing it off. Dr. Alan Morinis uses the metaphor of a lit match and a fuse. We practice Savlanut by extending the distance between the match and the fuse.
    {savlanut ice cream.jpg}
    Savlanut/Chesed Practice Standing in Line:
    Focus Phrases and Kabbalot
    (view changes)
    5:47 pm
  3. 5:46 pm

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